Where can you attend a service locally for Anzac Day?

Anzac Day 2017

Anzac Day is one of Australia’s most important national commemorative occasions. It marks the anniversary of the first major military action fought by Australian and New Zealand forces during the First World War.

It is 102 years ago that our brave ANZAC sons landed at Gallipoli. The 25th of April marks the anniversary of the first major military action fought by Australian and New Zealand forces during the First World War.

We remember the sacrifice of those who fought in the First World War and all wars so that we can enjoy freedom. We also recognise the role of our peacekeeping forces.

When is Anzac Day? 
Anzac Day falls on the 25th of April each year. The 25th of April was officially named Anzac Day in 1916.

What does 'ANZAC' stand for? 
'ANZAC' stands for Australian and New Zealand Army Corps. 

On the 25th of April 1915, Australian and New Zealand soldiers formed part of the allied expedition that set out to capture the Gallipoli peninsula. These became known as Anzacs and the pride they took in that name continues to this day. 

Why is this day special to Australians? 
On the morning of 25 April 1915, the Anzacs set out to capture the Gallipoli peninsula in order to open the Dardanelles to the allied navies. The objective was to capture Constantinople (now Istanbul in Turkey), the capital of the Ottoman Empire, and an ally of Germany. 

The Anzacs landed on Gallipoli and met fierce resistance from the Ottoman Turkish defenders. Their plan to knock Turkey out of the war quickly became a stalemate, and the campaign dragged on for eight months. 

At the end of 1915, the allied forces were evacuated. Both sides suffered heavy casualties and endured great hardships. Over 8,000 Australian soldiers were killed. News of the landing on Gallipoli and the events that followed had a profound impact on Australians at home. The 25th of April soon became the day on which Australians remember the sacrifice of those who had died in the war. 

The Anzacs were courageous and although the Gallipoli campaign failed in its military objectives, the Australian and New Zealand actions during the campaign left us all a powerful legacy. 

Where can you attend a service locally for Anzac Day?

Click here for ANZAC Day services in Sunraysia

Click here for local Anzac Day services in Victoria

Click here for local Anzac Day services in South Australia

 

 

 

 

 

VIDEO: Corporal Matthew Creek of the Royal Military College Band plays The Last Post at the Australian War Memorial, Canberra. The Last Post is one of a number of bugle calls in military tradition that mark the phases of the day. In military tradition, the Last Post is the bugle call that signifies the end of the day's activities. It is also sounded at military funerals to indicate that the soldier has gone to his

You may also like...

End of Vic Toyota a sad day: Shorten

End of Vic Toyota a sad day: Shorten

The end of car manufacturing in Victoria is a "sad day for Australia", Opposition Leader Bill Shorten says. About 2700 Toyota workers will be...

Flu claims 121 in Victorian aged care

Flu claims 121 in Victorian aged care

Victoria's horror flu season has killed 121 people in aged care and the government is pouring an extra $115 million into the health system to help...

Police cautions reduce reoffending: study

Police cautions reduce reoffending: study

Taking a hard line with young crooks might not be the answer to deterring them from committing further crimes, the results of a new Victorian...

Samuel Johnson to continue Connie's fight

Samuel Johnson to continue Connie's fight

Cancer campaigner Connie Johnson has been remembered as an "amazing" woman who fought tirelessly to help others in the face of her own certain death...